Fine software projects, news and thoughts from the Linux world.

Debian wheezy: Iceweasel 4 final, LibreOffice 3.3.2, GTK+ 2.24

Lots of nice upgrades have landed in sid in the last week. GTK+ 2.24.3 has been packaged. At some point in time this created quite a dependency hell, but it was resolved only a few hours later. GMP library has been upgraded to 5.0.1, everything OK. There are new minor upgrades of gcc, qt4, php5, apache2, postfix, policykit and lots of other stuff, too numerous to mention. LibreOffice is up to 3.3.2, and has been working very well since the switch from OpenOffice.org. xserver-xorg-core is at 1.9.5.

Debian wheezy: dpkg/dselect 1.15.8.10

Been a long time since last report. And there are some good reasons for that. Debian wheezy has progressed at a slower pace, with mostly incremental updates. On the bright side, there has not been any real breakage in the last two weeks. Iceweasel 4 (still from mozilla.debian.net) is up to RC1, and it has been running great. Openoffice.org packages are no longer packaged. Actually, they have been converted to empty transitional packages to ease the upgrade to LibreOffice. And more than 60 new Perl modules have found a way to wheezy, Perl packaging team is certainly doing a great job.

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Debian wheezy: GCC 4.5.2, Berkeley DB 5.1, GMP 5.0.1

Here's just a short notice that GCC/G++ 4.5.2 is now the default compiler in Wheezy. To test it, I've just recompiled the kernel (Linus' 2.6.37), and it's working great. Berkeley DB libdb-dev now depends on libdb5.1-dev instead of libdb4.8-dev. And finally, GMP (GNU multiprecision arithmetic library) is up to 5.0.1.

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Debian wheezy: Iceweasel 4 beta 12

Iceweasel 4 betas are still not in the unstable repository, but as I've seen that people of mozila.debian.net do a fine job packaging Firefox betas, I decided to switch from official Firefox betas to Iceweasel Debian package. Although still at beta stage, Firefox 4 does work stable and is also quite faster than Iceweasel 3. IMHO.

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Your favorite desktop environment?

Debian wheezy: Postfix 2.8.0, LibreOffice 3.3.1

Once again, things have slowed down. But, the news are mostly good, most if not all of the breakage reported 5 days ago has now been fixed. libpackage-stash-perl does not make trouble anymore. In fact, libnamespace-clean-perl was the one that had to be upgraded to fix the situation (#614597). Also, all the GNOME components that depended on (already removed) old evolution libraries have been fixed, so the GNOME is now in good shape.

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Debian wheezy: python 3.2, codeblocks and some breakage

My, oh, my, how things have changed in just 2 days. In contrast to my last blog entry where I stated that things have calmed down, today the picture is quite different.

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Debian wheezy: new kernel 2.6.37, evince and audacious fixed

Debian Wheezy is getting in a better shape every day, evince and audacious are installable again. For those of you who use Debian official kernel, probably the biggest news is new 2.6.37 kernel with accompanying modules. I compile my own kernels, so can't really comment on features and stability of the official kernel.

For AMD Radeon users, new version of xserver-xorg-video-radeon 6.14.0-1 could be interesting. Unfortunately, I don't own any Radeon card at the moment, though it might change in the near future.

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Debian wheezy: java security update, gnome-open problem workaround

After the initial rush of packages, things have slowed down a bit on the wheezy/sid front. The only notable update in the meantime has been new sun-java6-jdk 6.24 which fixes no less than 21 security bugs! You'll definitely want to pull that one and patch the numerous security holes.

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Living on the bleeding edge: Debian wheezy/sid

Hello world!

I've decided to start this blog and share my experience with Debian sid/unstable, the development version of Debian GNU/Linux. It's the leading edge, but sometimes also the bleeding edge of Debian development. The stuff that enters this fast developing repository spends anywhere from 6 months up to 2 years in it before average Linux user sees it in form of a polished stable release (Debian, Ubuntu or some other Debian Pure Blend).

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