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Updated: 3 min 53 sec ago

Best Android Phones For People Who Hate Android

Sun, 2016-05-29 16:11

‘How is that even possible’ – you’ll say.

Well, Android phones can now be a great choice – even for people who hate Android. The Apple vs. Android battle will never stop. However, we don’t have to pick sides anymore, simply because there are many Android phones that are not categorized and known by the ‘unwritten rules’ of Android.

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today's leftovers

Sun, 2016-05-29 12:44
  • What is Linux?
  • The Rumors Aren’t True

    I was listening to my usual round of amazing Linux Podcasts this week (you know who you are) and one of the discussions that made the rounds was about hardware compatibility issues with Linux. One of the hosts was bemoaning the issues with running linux on a repurposed MacBook and trying to get the wireless drivers to work. That led to a discussion about proprietary vs. non-proprietary drivers and you can pretty much guess how the conversation went from there.

  • Download Linux Voice issue 19

    Issue 19 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • LabXNow – Code, Develop, and Test Software From Anywhere on the Cloud

    LabXNow is a cloud service provider that offers a free and personal online environment to different users with direct access from a web browser. You can think of it as your personal remote lab, where you can play around, code, develop or whatever you want. You can access it from anywhere with an Internet connection.

  • BoilingSteam has a nice podcast episode with the creator of SteamOS tools
  • Please, Don’t Touch Anything now supports Linux, don't you dare touch that button

    You all just want to buy it so you can press the button don't you? I know I do. Please, Don’t Touch Anything is now officially available on Linux with a nice discount.

  • Meet KDE Neon, A New Linux Distro Based on Ubuntu Linux

    KDE Neon is the latest and probably the best technology the KDE Community has developed, and I stand to be corrected if it is not so. You can call it a new Linux distro but KDE Neon is basically built comprehensively on Ubuntu Linux as the core, to bring the latest and hottest software developed by the KDE Community in a rolling release format to KDE desktop environment users.

    The KDE Neon project is intended to provide users cutting-edge features on a highly configurable and yet stable desktop in a single package. The packages made in KDE Neon are based on Ubuntu and are not compatible with other Linux distros such as Arch Linux and OpenSUSE as stated by Jonathan Riddell, one of the project heads and who was previously in charge of the Kubuntu Linux project.

  • Do you like Windows 10 Look but Love LINUX? Here are Windows 10 GTK Themes for you!

    Many people liked the Interface of Windows 10 because now it carries all those features which Linux already have from years. Do you like the look of Windows 10 but don't want to use it? Here we brought Windows 10 GTK themes for you, this theme offers two versions Light and Dark, you can use whatever you like. But hold on, now many people will say like 'why you are so obsessed by other operating systems and so, Linux is great OS', yeah I do agree that many geeks consider Linux above all operating systems. The superiority of the Linux shows that you can do whatever you like to do with your OS, change look/design and so, that's called freedom. We should appreciate new comers to Linux instead of letting them down, and people leave Linux because they think it is quite difficult to survive with this OS.

  • Manjaro Update 2016-05-22 (stable)

    We are happy to announce our first update for Manjaro 16.06-rc1 (Daniella)!

  • Hackfest 1.2 (Day 2)

    Welcome to Day 2 of the Solus Hackfest 1.2!

  • This Week in Solus – Install #29
  • Unixstickers Gives Back to FOSS Projects
  • Chalet OS 16.04LTS
  • ChaletOS 16.04 - See What's New
  • New Gentoo LiveDVD "Choice Edition"
  • Chromium 51 packages available
  • Debian: Outreachy, Debian Reproducible builds Week 1 Progress Report
  • Puppet 4 uploaded to Debian unstable

    Puppet 4 has been uploaded to Debian unstable. This is a major upgrade from Puppet 3.

    If you are using Puppet, chances are that it is handling important bits of your infrastructure, and you should upgrade with care.

    Here are some points to consider.

  • Pocket CHIP $49 Indie Game Console

    Last year, we were impressed by Next Thing Co's $9 CHIP computer. At Maker Faire 2016, we were able to check out their PocketCHIP housing, which puts CHIP into a portable console package that runs Linux and indie game console Pico-8. Here's what you can do with the $49 system!

  • Finnish Govt Disappointed with Microsoft’s Job Cuts, Says They Impact Economy

    Microsoft has recently announced a new round of job layoffs at its Mobile unit in Finland, as it moves forward with its restructuring and reorganization plan following the acquisition of Nokia’s Devices and Services unit.

  • The Nokia Saga Predictions on This Blog: Full Listing with Links[Ed: Microsoft killed Nokia]

    So lets understand the context of when Elop came in. Nokia in 2009 sold 67.8 million smartphones globally (with 39% market share). This was a world record obivously and Nokia set record profits in its smartphone unit. In 2010 Nokia then grew 35.8 million new smartphone sales (growth rate of 53% !!!!). Nokia from 2009 to 2010 grew MORE than Apple even thought Apple released its most popular new iPhone model ever, the iPhone 4. Apple grew 22.4 million units but Nokia grew more, Nokia grew 35.8 million new smartphones. Very literally mathematically irrevocably true - Nokia was WINNING against Apple iPhone in 2010. Nokia GREW MORE than Apple with its MOST iconic new smartphone. The GAP between Nokia and Apple was NOT CLOSING, it was GROWING. Nokia was PULLING AWAY from Apple in 2010. Look at the numbers side-by-side...

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Derivatives

Sun, 2016-05-29 12:41

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Leftovers: OSS

Sun, 2016-05-29 12:38
  • Rise of Open Cloud Architecture and Over-the-Top (OTT) Network Services
  • Amazon’s Giving Away the AI Behind Its Product Recommendations

    Amazon has become the latest tech giant that’s giving away some of its most sophisticated technology. Today the company unveiled DSSTNE (pronounced “destiny”), an open source artificial intelligence framework that the company developed to power its product recommendation system. Now any company, researcher, or curious tinkerer can use it for their own AI applications.

  • Genode OS Framework release 16.05

    The current release marks the most profound API revision in the project's history. The new API is designed to reinforce the best practices for implementing Genode components. It is the result of countless experiments and the practical experiences made while developing over hundred genuine components during the past ten years.

  • Old projects and the free-software community

    The Community Leadership Summit (CLS) is an annual event for community managers, developer evangelists, people who work on public-facing forums, and those with a general interest in engagement or community development for free-software projects. The 2016 edition was held in Austin, Texas the weekend before OSCON. Several sessions at CLS 2016 dealt with the differences exhibited between old and new free-software projects where community management is concerned. One of those tackled the problem of how to foster community around an older software project, which poses a distinct set of challenges.

  • Thunderbird powered by SoftMaker

    Thunderbird, powered by SoftMaker, is a custom version of the popular email client featuring enhancements that come all in the form of extensions.

    [...]

    SoftMaker, a company best known for its SoftMaker Office suite, announced recently that it plans to include the Thunderbird email client into the 2016 version of the office suite.

  • The Document Liberation Project: What we do

    The Document Liberation Project: empowering creators to free their data from proprietary formats.

  • EMC Releases UniK Software for Cloud and IoT App Deployments
  • Microsoft Research Awards Demonstrate Commitment to Open Source [Ed: Microsoft openwashing and claims to be about research rather than cheating, bribery, witch-hunting etc.]
  • The open-source generation gap

    OSI General Manager Patrick Masson was one of the session's attendees, and he pushed back on that last point. There is too much "open-washing" these days, he said, but it does not come from the OSI. There is still only one Open Source Definition; the dilution of the term comes from others who use "open" to describe organizations, workflows, processes, and other things unrelated to software licensing. "We have open hardware and open data, but also 'open cola' and 'open beer.' That blurs over an important distinction. Not everything fits."

    [...]

    Among the other points raised during the session, attendees noted that it was important that the community distinguish between minting new project contributors and minting new free-software activists, and that it was important for projects to put a check on flamewar-style debates—particularly those that focus on dismissing certain technologies. It is easy for experienced developers to become attached to a language or framework, but there will always be new languages and projects popping up that are the entry points for new coders. Project members deriding language Y because it is not language X may only serve to tell newcomers that they are not welcome.

  • A discussion on combining CDDL and GPL code

    Within the context of an event dedicated to discussing free and open-source software (FOSS) legalities, such as the Free Software Legal & Licensing Workshop (LLW), the topic of conflicting licenses was bound to come up. The decision by Canonical to start shipping the ZFS filesystem with its Ubuntu server distribution back in February led to a discussion at LLW about distributing the kernel combined with ZFS. Discussions at LLW are held under the Chatham House Rule, which means that names and affiliations of participants are only available for those who have agreed to be identified. This year's LLW was held in Barcelona, April 13-15.

  • Mobile Age: using mobility and open data to include senior citizens in open government

    Helping older European people to be part of the open government process and encouraging their access to civic participation through mobility are the main goals of the Mobile Age project, launched last February.

  • All European scientific articles to be freely accessible by 2020

    And, according to the new Innovation Principle, new European legislation must take account of its impact on innovation. These are the main outcomes of the meeting of the Competitiveness Council in Brussels on 27 May.

  • Council of the European Union calls for full open access to scientific research by 2020

    A few weeks ago we wrote about how the European Union is pushing ahead its support for open access to EU-funded scientific research and data. Today at the meeting of the Council of the European Union, the Council reinforced the commitment to making all scientific articles and data openly accessible and reusable by 2020.

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: An Interface For The Headless Linux System

    Connecting a headless Raspberry Pi to a wireless network can be quite a paradoxical situation. To connect it to the network, you need to open an SSH connection to configure the wireless port. But to do so, you need a network connection in the first place. Of course, you can still get command-line access using a USB-to-UART adapter or the Pi’s ethernet port – if present – but [Arsenijs] worked out a much more convenient solution for his Hackaday Prize entry: The pyLCI Linux Control Interface.

  • RepRap, Open Source and 3DPrinting

    The RepRap project started in 2005 by Adrian Bowyer – “Mister RepRap”, when the patent about this technology expired. 3DPrintings isn’t a new technology, history dates that the first model of stereolithography printing emerged in 1984. The main idea around RepRap projects is to produce 3DPrinters that can auto-replicate most of the parts itself. And in 2006, the RepRap 0.2 successfully printed the first part of itself and in 2008, the first 3d model was printed by an end-user. Currently, the printer more replicated and customized of the 67 printers that are listed on RepRap website, is the Prusa Mendel, the model created by Josef Průša, that was disponibility to the public in 2011 and had a lot of development since.

  • Here is a web interface for switching on your light

    Like I mentioned in a previous post, I wanted to try out a more hackable wifi plug. I got a Kankun “smart” plug. Like the other one I have the software is horrible. The good news is that they left SSH enabled on it.

  • LeMaker Guitar review

    Anyone who has worked with the Compute Module will find the LeMaker Guitar immediately familiar. The system-on-chip processor, an Actions S500, sits alongside 1GB of memory, a combined audio and power management unit, and 8GB of NAND flash storage on an over-sized small-outline DIMM (SODIMM) form factor circuit board. This board then connects to a baseboard, supplied with the Guitar, which provides more accessible connectivity than the SODIMM’s 204 electrical contacts.

  • Open Source Vs Personal Life — Should GitHub Remove Contribution Graph?

    Should GitHub remove contribution graph from the personal profile of the contributors or the developers? This step might be taken for the personal well-being of the developers. Open source is good but personal life cannot be ignored either.

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Leftovers: BSD

Sun, 2016-05-29 12:36

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Security Leftovers

Sun, 2016-05-29 12:33

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Red Hat News

Sun, 2016-05-29 11:30
  • Why SELinux is inherently complex

    The root of SELinux's problems is that SELinux is a complex security mechanism that is hard to get right. Unfortunately this complexity is not (just) simply an implementation artifact of the current SELinux code; instead, it's inherent in what SELinux is trying to do.

  • SELinux is beyond saving at this point

    SELinux has problems. It has a complexity problem (in that it is quite complex), it has technical problems with important issues like usability and visibility, it has pragmatic problems with getting in the way, and most of all it has a social problem. At this point, I no longer believe that SELinux can be saved and become an important part of the Linux security landscape (at least if Linux remains commonly used).

    The fundamental reason why SELinux is beyond saving at this point is that after something like a decade of SELinux's toxic mistake, the only people who are left in the SELinux community are the true believers, the people who believe that SELinux is not a sysadmin usability nightmare, that those who disable it are fools, and so on. That your community narrows is what naturally happens when you double down on calling other people things; if people say you are an idiot for questioning the SELinux way, well, you generally leave.

  • Systemd 230 Is Upsetting Some Over Its KillUserProcess Setting

    Systemd 230 was released just last week and it has taken heat not only for opening up FBDEV to potential security issues, which already reverted, but also for changing the default behavior of user processes.

    Systemd 230 made a change where KillUserProcess defaults to yes. This terminates user processes that are part of the user session scope when the user logs out. This is causing problems for ssh-agent, screen, and other common Linux processes.

  • Basics you must know for RHCSA Exam preparation
  • Test Fedora 24 Beta in an OpenStack cloud

    Although there are a few weeks remaining before Fedora 24 is released, you can test out the Fedora 24 Beta release today! This is a great way to get a sneak peek at new features and help find bugs that still need a fix.

  • State of syslog-ng 3.8 rpm packaging
  • My Fedora Badges intern

    For the past two weeks I was lucky to have an intern, who worked on Fedora Badges. Badges is a great way to start as a Fedora design contributor, as they have low entry level. Templates are ready, graphics is available to download, all the resources available here.

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Leftovers: Software

Sun, 2016-05-29 11:27
  • Whatsie An Unofficial WhatsApp Alternative Client Available For Linux

    Whatsie is a simple, free, open source desktop client for WhatsApp web, it is cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and OS X. Whatsie client offers many features like Themes (7 different variants) & Minimode, Native Notifications, Spell Checker & Auto Correct, Keyboard Shortcuts, Start on Boot up, and AppIndicator/close to tray option. You can also join the development of Whatsie and help developer by any means, see the GitHub page.

  • XnViewMP is a Full-featured Image Manipulation and Batch Converter Tool

    The quality of image and video capture has improved tremendously over the years and the capabilities of our digital devices continue to push the limits of image quality. However, there is a bummer! The high-res images we take does come at the hefty price of an increase in the size of images taken.

    For this reason, uploading images on the internet can be painfully slow especially if you’re on a network with minimal bandwidth. While there are varying online services and softwares for other platforms that will effectively convert your image files while still maintaining the original quality, it is rather hard to come by native clients for Linux systems.

  • XenServer Dundee Released

    It was a little over a year ago when I introduced a project code named Dundee to this community. In the intervening year, we've had a number pre-release builds; all introducing ever greater capabilities into what I'm now happy to announce as XenServer 7. As you would expect from a major version number, XenServer 7 makes some rather significant strides forward, and defines a significant new capability.

  • Meet Franz – Alles Klar Herr Kommissar?

    I decided to try Franz on Linux, and I chose the somewhat less than obvious CentOS 7 for this task, just to show that it can be done with modernity and delight. The installation package is an archive, which you extract, and then run the Franz binary. That is all. An elegant, somewhat flat and utterly HTML-JS-rich client will launch.

  • Access Blocked Websites In Censored Regions With Lantern

    Lantern is a free, open source internet censorship circumvention software that was created to "give users fast access to the blocked Internet". The application is available for desktops (Linux, Windows, Mac) and Android.

  • MKVToolNix 9.2.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Brings Small Fixes and Improvements

    Moritz Bunkus announced the second major release of his powerful and open source MKV (Matroska) manipulation utility for all supported operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and MacOS.

    MKVToolNix 9.2.0 comes a little over a month since the release of MKVToolNix 9.1.0, but users should not expect any many new features, as the developer only had time to fix some of the issues that have been reported during this time. There is, however, an important change in the mkvinfo component, but it only affects those who use the software on Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X platforms.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.100.3.0

    The first Armadillo release of the 7.* series is out: a new version 7.100.3. We uploaded RcppArmadillo 0.7.100.3.0 to CRAN and Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now 230 packages using it.

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Leftovers: KDE

Sun, 2016-05-29 09:54
  • Plasma Wayland ISO Checkup

    My Plasma Wayland ISOs are building nicely fresh each day. I asked Betty the fuzzy Guinea Pig to gave one a try today and there’s still obvious bugs like no text on task bar and the blue window bars are back but she’s generally impressed at how this is likely to be a good replacement for X in the near future.

  • Call for new KStars splash screen

    KStars gained two seats for Google Summer of Code 2016. The first project is to develop KStars Lite, a small footprint KStars aimed for tablet/mobile and low powered devices. The second project is to port KStars to Windows, including migration of INDI Client library and Ekos. Both projects are progressing along quite nicely and we expect to see stellar results by the end of the summer.

  • KDAB Training Day at QtCon
  • Faster than Fast String Search in Qt
  • Very explicit operator bool
  • Kdenlive: features and next Cafés

    Our monthly Kdenlive Cafés (*) really helped us focusing the development on some awesome features. We now have a small team of really involved people that help us evolve towards the best free open source video editor for professionnals.

  • KDev-Embedded, The alpha version is coming !

    Today one of the most important steps was performed, the first upload to a microController. The code was a blink compiled with a makefile and uploaded with the KDev-Embedded plugin to an AVR microController (Arduino Nano board).

  • Verdigris: Qt without moc

    Verdigris is a header-only library that can be used with Qt. It uses macros to create a QMetaObject that is binary compatible with Qt's own QMetaObject without requiring moc. In other words, you can use Verdigris macros in your Qt or QML application instead of some of the Qt macros and then you do not need to run moc.

  • Kubuntu Party 4 – The Gathering of Halflings

    Come and join us for a most excellent Gathering of Halflings at Kubuntu Party 4, Friday 17th June 19:00 UTC.

  • Some plans do not cooperate with you…

    I reached the creator at the IRC channel of KDE to see if he could help me, and Jonathan Riddel gives me the help that I need it, at the selection of bugs that I could work and others things that I was thinking about Umbrello. After two days, one before the end of submission time, I submitted my project to the KDE Community.

  • Coding at Lakademy

    Today is the third day that Lakademy is happening at Federal University of State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), and since the first hour, I’m doing a lot of code. The work is concentrate on my GSoC Project, and finally getting on track on my work in Umbrello.

  • if (LaKademy 2016) goto Rio de Janeiro

    Rio de Janeiro, the “Cidade Maravilhosa”, land of the eternal Summer. The sunlight here is always clear and hot, the sea is refreshing, the sand is comfortable. The people is happy, Rio de Janeiro has good music, food, the craziest parties of the world, and beautiful bodies having fun with beach games (do you know futevolei?).

  • Breeze Dark Color Scheme

    Just as quick info, with the next KDE Frameworks 5 release, namely KF5 version 5.23, the KTextEditor framework gains a Breeze Dark color scheme. The colors mostly stick to the Breeze color palette, with some minor changes, since KTextEditor needs more colors the the color palette itself ships. To use this color scheme, go to the config dialog and choose “Breeze Dark” in the Fonts & Colors config page. We hope this is useful – mandatory screenshot:

  • kmail 16.04.1 and Novell Groupwise 2014 IMAP server - anyone?
  • Yet Another GSoC Blog

    TL;DR: Well Hey there, Chantara here. I will be working with 2 awesome mentors, Stikonas and teo-, to add LVM and hopefully RAID support for KDE Partition Manager and KPMCore library over my summer with Google Summer of Code. If you’re interested, read on!!!

  • KDE Partition Manager 2.2.0

    KDE Partition Manager and KPMcore 2.2.0 are now released with a proper LUKS support! This is a fairly big feature release but it also got tested more than usual, so a lot of bugs were fixed (including some crashes). Unfortunately there is still one more reproducible crash (bug 363294) on exit when file open/save dialogs are used (and very similar crashes actually exist in some other KDE programs, e.g. kdebugdialog or Marble). If anybody has any idea how to fix it I would be grateful.

  • Hello KDE

    Plasma Mobile Emulator will be the solution for developing, testing and accessing plasma mobile system without having to install on real phone.

  • Interview with Neotheta
  • The work on animation features continues

    While the first stable Krita version with animation is just around the corner, I am already rolling up my sleeves with plans to take the feature to the next level. It's Google Summer of Code time again.

    A lot has happened since last year. Import for image sequences was added, the timeline docker was reworked and a large number of smaller changes and fixes were implemented to make the animation tools ready for inclusion in Krita 3.0. For a nice overview, check out GDQuest's video tutorial.

  • Free Software Artists and their Tools — Part I: David Revoy & Krita

    The idea that Free Software has no decent design programs, and that it is impossible to produce quality art without proprietary apps is one of those myths that refuses to die. For quite some time now, OCSmag has been on a mission to prove otherwise. In this latest series we talk to three artists who use Free Software tools to produce their works.

  • Krita at KomMissia

    Last weekend, ace Krita hacker Dmitry Kazakov attended KomMissia, the annual Russian comics festival. Best quote award goes to the Wacom booth attendants, who install Krita on all their demo machines because “too many people keep asking about it”!

  • KStars on Windows – Alpha version

    Using emerge tool, I started to build KStars on Windows. Since this process could be very troublesome, I used a Windows 7 32-bit virtual machine. Actually, for building KDE sources, the KDE developers recommend the 32-bit version of Windows 7.

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Kubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus - Not meant to be

Sun, 2016-05-29 05:35

There's one thing that is consistent with the Xenial family of spring disappointments. The disappointment. When one goes bad, you know they all do, and in this regard, Ubuntu LTS delivers badly across its entire range. 16.04 was meant to be sweet hope, salvation and joy, it is just a string of rushed, badly QA-ed images.

Kubuntu Xerus does not have any redeeming factors. It's pretty all right, but it's buggy, Samba support is weak, smartphone support is sub-par, package management is atrocious, battery life is just average but still much worse than the spectacularly useless Werewolf release, and there are lots of other small problems everywhere. Nothing about this particular edition oozes confidence, quality or long-term vision. Really sad. 2/10. My weekend has been ruined again, thank you. Don't bother. Bye.

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Cinnamon 3.0.4 Desktop Updates the Overlay Scrollbar, Sound and Menu Applets

Sun, 2016-05-29 04:52

While the Linux Mint 18 operating system is still in heavy development, Clement Lefebvre and his team of developers announced a new update for the Cinnamon 3.0 desktop environment.

Cinnamon 3.0.4 is now the latest version of the acclaimed GNOME 3-based open-source graphical desktop interface, which will be used by default for the upcoming Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" OS, on the Cinnamon Edition, of course. It comes a few days after the release of Cinnamon 3.0.3.

Also: The New Control Center Is Being Worked On For GNOME 3.22

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4MRecover 18.0 Data Recovery Live CD Now in Beta, Adds PhotoRec and TestDisk 7.0

Sun, 2016-05-29 04:44

Zbigniew Konojacki has informed Softpedia today about the availability of the Beta release of his upcoming 4MRecover 18.0 data recovery Live CD distrolette, which is now ready for public testing.

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Linux and FOSS Events

Sun, 2016-05-29 02:47
  • Reporting on OSCON 2016

    Last week was OSCON 2016, and the first year that the conference was held in Austin, Texas. OSCON has always been an important conference for Conservancy and for me personally. In 2011, it was the first conference I ever keynoted (I was also on a keynote panel in 2008, which was the closest I’d gotten before then), and where I really started talking about my heart condition and medical devices. OSCON was also the conference where we had the first Conservancy booth and debuted Conservancy t-shirts and stickers.

  • Day -1 of PyCon US 2016

    I reached Portland two days back, was happy to see that Remy helped us to find a hotel just opposite to the conference center. As I am typing this, I can see the empty roads, and the main doors of the venue. Yesterday also I woke up by 5AM, the virtue of being in a place 12:30 hours apart from your standard timezone After writing the article about Microbit support in Fedora (it is still under review) I moved to the conference venue. It was very easy to find the staff room. As usual Doug,Lvh,Eric were already there, later I met Ewa, and then met Betsy for the first time. While discussing security practices when I asked, Lvh pointed out that getting golang vendored sources in the source code repository and then not updating them later, is more of a software engineering problem than a security problem as he sees.

  • Running a Hackerspace

    I wrote parts of this post after our last monthly assembly at Athens Hackerspace. Most of the hackerspace operators are dealing with this monthly meeting routinely and we often forget what we have achieved during the last 5 years and how many great things this physical space enabled to happen. But this post is not about our hackerspace. It's an effort to distant myself and try to write about the experience of running a hackerspace.

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