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Linux and FOSS Events

Sun, 2016-05-29 02:47
  • Reporting on OSCON 2016

    Last week was OSCON 2016, and the first year that the conference was held in Austin, Texas. OSCON has always been an important conference for Conservancy and for me personally. In 2011, it was the first conference I ever keynoted (I was also on a keynote panel in 2008, which was the closest I’d gotten before then), and where I really started talking about my heart condition and medical devices. OSCON was also the conference where we had the first Conservancy booth and debuted Conservancy t-shirts and stickers.

  • Day -1 of PyCon US 2016

    I reached Portland two days back, was happy to see that Remy helped us to find a hotel just opposite to the conference center. As I am typing this, I can see the empty roads, and the main doors of the venue. Yesterday also I woke up by 5AM, the virtue of being in a place 12:30 hours apart from your standard timezone After writing the article about Microbit support in Fedora (it is still under review) I moved to the conference venue. It was very easy to find the staff room. As usual Doug,Lvh,Eric were already there, later I met Ewa, and then met Betsy for the first time. While discussing security practices when I asked, Lvh pointed out that getting golang vendored sources in the source code repository and then not updating them later, is more of a software engineering problem than a security problem as he sees.

  • Running a Hackerspace

    I wrote parts of this post after our last monthly assembly at Athens Hackerspace. Most of the hackerspace operators are dealing with this monthly meeting routinely and we often forget what we have achieved during the last 5 years and how many great things this physical space enabled to happen. But this post is not about our hackerspace. It's an effort to distant myself and try to write about the experience of running a hackerspace.

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NetBSD 7.0.1 released

Sun, 2016-05-29 02:22

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 7.0.1, the first security/bugfix update of the NetBSD 7.0 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons. If you are running an earlier release of NetBSD, we strongly suggest updating to 7.0.1.

Also: NetBSD 7.0.1 Brings Bug & Security Fixes

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The Future of GNOME Control Center

Sat, 2016-05-28 21:37

Hello, GNOMErs! As some of you may be aware, I’m working on porting our beloved GNOME Control Center to match the latest mockups. Not alone, however; we’re a Team.

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Black Duck's Free Tool Digs Out Open Source Bugs

Sat, 2016-05-28 20:11

The main advantage of such tools is ease of use. The main limitation is that a tool is only as effective as its creators' list of vulnerabilities. Using a given tool implies that you trust the vendor to stay alert and on the job, noted King.

Developers have "a ton of other similar offerings out there," he said. By offering a free scanner, Black Duck can draw attention to its other products.

"If the new tool delivers what the company promises, it will help put the company in good stead with customer developers. Satisfied customers tend to be repeat customers," King said.

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today's leftovers

Sat, 2016-05-28 15:27

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Linux Foundation and Linux

Sat, 2016-05-28 15:26

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Oracle Desperate

Sat, 2016-05-28 15:20

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Sat, 2016-05-28 15:19

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Security Leftovers

Sat, 2016-05-28 15:16
  • Friday's security updates
  • Judge Says The FBI Can Keep Its Hacking Tool Secret, But Not The Evidence Obtained With It

    Michaud hasn't had the case against him dismissed, but the government will now have to rely on evidence it didn't gain access to by using its illegal search. And there can't be much of that, considering the FBI had no idea who Michaud was or where he resided until after the malware-that-isn't-malware had stripped away Tor's protections and revealed his IP address.

    The FBI really can't blame anyone but itself for this outcome. Judge Bryan may have agreed that the FBI had good reason to keep its technique secret, but there was nothing preventing the FBI from voluntarily turning over details on its hacking tool to Michaud. But it chose not to, despite his lawyer's assurance it would maintain as much of the FBI's secrecy as possible while still defending his client.

    Judge Bryan found the FBI's ex parte arguments persuasive and declared the agency could keep the info out of Michaud's hands. But doing so meant the judicial playing field was no longer level, as he acknowledged in his written ruling. Fortunately, the court has decided it's not going to allow the government to have its secrecy cake and eat it, too. If it wants to deploy exploits with minimal judicial oversight, then it has to realize it can't successfully counter suppression requests with vows of silence.

  • Researcher Pockets $30,000 in Chrome Bounties

    Having cashed in earlier in May to the tune of $15,500, Mlynski pocketed another $30,000 courtesy of Google’s bug bounty program after four high-severity vulnerabilities were patched in the Chrome browser, each worth $7,500 to the white-hat hacker.

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Gentoo "Choice Edition" Released, Slackware & Tumbleweed Latest

Sat, 2016-05-28 13:47

The big news today was the release of Gentoo 20160514, dubbed "Choice Edition" because it is especially good, cool, and excellent. In related news, Calculate Linux received an updated release and Computer Business Reviews answers, "What is Ubuntu?" Dimstar posted the latest changes to Tumbleweed and Slackware-current got some new updates. Laurent Montel answered Andreas Huettel's post on Akonadi must die and Fedora 24 sports new font improvements.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Sat, 2016-05-28 13:45

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Programming

Sat, 2016-05-28 13:35
  • 10 Best Cheat Sheets That A Programmer Must Have
  • Thoughts on JSRs, TCKs, and Open Source

    In the Java EE umbrella every piece of technology is standardized under a JSR (Java Specification Request). The Expert Groups of the JSRs have to deliver the specification, a Reference Implementation, and a TCK (Technology Compatibility Kit). For most of the JSRs, the TCK is licensed as closed-source software and is not available for the public.

  • Omniscient DevOps? JFrog introduces Xray
  • Ciena Intros Blue Planet DevOps Toolkit for SDN/NFV

    The kit consists of a set of software development tools and community resources that allow operators to integrate network resources such as devices, functions, or domains (physical or virtual), as well as customize service templates, with the Blue Planet Network and Service Orchestration software.

  • Devops: A Culture or Concrete Activity?

    In traditional software development, the professionals who were responsible for building a company's applications were referred to as development. The team that tested the applications was QA management. At this point, the program would be handed off to operations, which would then be responsible for maintenance and update management.

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UbuCon Paris Party Starts Today In Celebration of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Release

Sat, 2016-05-28 10:31

Yesterday we reported on the fact that even if Canonical unveiled the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system last month, on April 21, several LoCos are still organizing release parties.

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Why I won’t use Dropbox’s Project Infinite if it’s not open source

Sat, 2016-05-28 10:22

Why not Dropbox? Because the open source community can’t see the Dropbox source code, there is no way to know what Dropbox does to my stuff. Experts should be able to audit Dropbox source code to ensure there are no security vulnerabilities, that there are no back doors.

Beyond that, I am not comfortable with making any company a co-owner of my files. I don’t want to be at the mercy of a company that can revoke access to my data for whatever reason. I am not comfortable with the idea that my data could be subject to scanning and privacy-invading laws that otherwise don’t apply to my local data.

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Open-source vs. Proprietary – Keeping Ideology Out of the Equation

Sat, 2016-05-28 10:16

Open-source really means no more and no less than making the source code readily available to anyone. Thus, open-source makes no statement as to the licensing conditions for using the software, whether there are charges for using the software, whether the software is supported, or actively developed, or any good, and so on. Closed-source means that source code is not readily available, but makes no comment on issues like licensing, costs, support, and quality.

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NetOS Enterprise Linux 8 Promises to Be a Worthy Alternative to Chrome OS

Sat, 2016-05-28 09:04

Black Lab Software CEO Roberto J. Dohnert informs Softpedia today about the general availability of the NetOS Enterprise Developer Preview 8 operating system.

Designed as a replacement for the Linux kernel-based Chrome OS or Chromium OS operating systems, Black Lab Software's upcoming NetOS distribution is using the same technologies that have been implemented in the Enterprise Edition of the Black Lab Linux OS.

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