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Updated: 16 min 49 sec ago

Arch Linux Take Your Linux Knowledge To Next Level [Review]

Fri, 2016-08-19 23:00

This review will be a bit unconventional, probably because Arch Linux itself is a bit unconventional. Rather than having continued, numbered releases like most distros, Arch Linux follows the rolling-release model, meaning that you install Arch once and it updates forever (or at least, until you break something). There is no “Arch Linux 16.04 LTS”, there is simply Arch Linux. The philosophy of Arch, known as The Arch Way, focuses on simplicity and user centrality, rather than user friendliness.

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kdenlive 16.08.0 released

Fri, 2016-08-19 20:52

Kdenlive 16.08.0 marks a milestone in the project’s history bringing it a step closer to becoming a full-fledged professional tool. The highlights of this release are:

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Beyond Linux: 7 Open-Source Projects the Linux Foundation Is Leading

Fri, 2016-08-19 19:01

The Linux Foundation got its start in 2007 as a home for the development of Linux and its creator Linus Torvalds. In the last decade, the mission of the foundation has expanded beyond the confines of the Linux kernel. Although the Linux kernel still remains central, the foundation's model of enabling open, collaborative software development has proven valuable to multiple groups. That's where the Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects effort comes in, enabling groups of developers to bring software projects under the Linux Foundation umbrella. By being part of the foundation, software projects benefit from its infrastructure and expertise at helping to shepherd and grow open-source software development efforts in a vendor-neutral approach. A 2014 slideshow on eWEEK looked at 10 projects beyond Linux that the foundation now manages. So far in 2016, the Linux Foundation has announced at least seven new efforts that are now collaborative projects. eWEEK takes a look at some of the efforts the foundation is leading beyond just Linux.

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New BlackArch Linux ISO Lands with Over 1,500 Penetration Testing, Hacking Tools

Fri, 2016-08-19 18:23

The skilful team of developers and security professional behind the BlackArch Linux operating system have announced today, August 19, 2016, the general availability of a new ISO image.

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Linux Foundation Conquers the World, or at Least Becomes Quite Influential in SDN & NFV

Fri, 2016-08-19 18:17

Open source projects are new to networking, but they’ve been cropping up all over the place in the last couple of years. And many of them are gravitating toward the Linux Foundation.

Some of them were originally independent groups. The Open Network Operating System (ONOS) for example, was founded by On.lab. But in October, it became part of the Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation was already hosting the OpenDaylight Project, which some considered a rival to ONOS. But the two groups seem to be happily coexisting under the same host.

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Android Leftovers

Fri, 2016-08-19 18:16

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Wine 1.9.17 Improves Joystick Support, Gun Metal and Multiple DirectX9 Games

Fri, 2016-08-19 18:12

Today, August 19, 2016, the Wine development team announced the release of Wine 1.9.17, a new milestone towards the next major stable branch of the open-source software that lets Linux users run Windows apps and games, Wine 2.0.

Also: Wine 1.9.17 Released, Direct3D CSMT & D3D11 Still Lacking

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Open source uproar as MariaDB goes commercial

Fri, 2016-08-19 17:53

MariaDB Corp. has announced that release 2.0 of its MaxScale database proxy software is henceforth no longer open source. The organization has made it source-available under a proprietary license that promises each release will eventually become open source once it's out of date.

MaxScale is at the pinnacle of MariaDB Corp.'s monetization strategy -- it's the key to deploying MariaDB databases at scale. The thinking seems to be that making it mandatory to pay for a license will extract top dollar from deep-pocketed corporations that might otherwise try to use it free of charge. This seems odd for a company built on MariaDB, which was originally created to liberate MySQL from the clutches of Oracle.

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2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Ahmed Alkabary: A Recent Graduate and Aspiring SysAdmin

Fri, 2016-08-19 17:47

For me, I don’t just appreciate the Linux operating system but I also feel like it has become my life. Whenever I’m on a Linux based computer I feel like I’m at home. You can say it is a passion that has taken many years of cultivating to become integrated in my life the way it is today.

In 2011 I was eager to purchase a brand new computer, but to my dismay the shop had only one computer that met my requirements. Although unbeknownst to me the computer had a specific operating system that I was unfamiliar with. The operating system was pre-installed with Linux, specifically openSuse. I was so hesitant to purchase the computer but proceeded anyway. I hoped to change the operating system once I got home, but I was unsure of what came over me to keep Linux. But to this day I feel I have yet to make a decision that would have a greater impact on my life then the day I decided to keep Linux.

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Alfonso Savio: How Do You Fedora?

Fri, 2016-08-19 17:43

Alfonso Savio is a man of many talents. Alfonso works for the National Cancer Institute of Naples and started using Linux in 2004 with Fedora Core 3. He’s a systems integrator, systems and network administrator, project and database manager, and software developer. However, his official title is ICT Manager of the Clinical Trials Unit.

Alfonso’s team analyzes data from clinical trials to advance scientific research in the fight against cancer. The team comprises physicians and data managers. He is the sole person in his department using Linux for his primary desktop. Hence, he’s an open source trailblazer.

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Benchmarks: 2 BSDs vs. 7 Linux Distributions

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:49

The operating systems tested for this comparison included CentOS Linux 7, Clear Linux 9710, DragonFlyBSD 4.6.0, Fedora 24, FreeBSD 11.0-Beta 4, Manjaro 16.06.1, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, and a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 16.10. For those wondering about OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, I'll have tests of that Clang-compiled distribution later in the week. This BSD/Linux OS comparison grew out of curiosity sake when first seeking to test how well DragonFlyBSD 4.6 and FreeBSD 11 are performing.

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More Games for GNU/Linux

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:47

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Linux Graphics

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:42

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today's leftovers

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:19
  • Windows 10's upgrade model temporarily wipes $1.6B from Microsoft's books

    the distribution and maintenance of Windows 10 put a $1.6 billion temporary dent in its revenue, the company said Thursday.

    In a filing covering the March quarter, Microsoft pointed to the revenue deferral of Windows 10 -- a relatively new way of accounting for the Redmond, Wash. company -- as a reason for the 6% year-over-year decline in revenue.

    "Revenue decreased $1.2 billion or 6%, primarily due to the impact of a net revenue deferral related to Windows 10 of $1.6 billion and an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately $838 million or 4%," Microsoft's 10-Q filing with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) stated.

    The $1.6 billion in Windows 10 revenue during the March quarter didn't actually vanish: It was instead deferred and will hit the bottom line over the next two to four years.

  • Netrunner Desktop version becomes Maui 1

    Maui will continue as the full desktop version of the previously Kubuntu based Netrunner line:

    What basically equals Netrunner+1 is simply released under the new name “Maui 1″.

    Being based on KDE neon, Maui also marks the transition to an LTS base, where some parts are receiving regular updates during its lifecycle (so called “partially rolling”).

  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST development sprint 23

    As you may know, it’s possible to install (open)SUSE in an automatic, even completely unattended, basis using AutoYaST. AutoYaST can be configured to display custom configuration dialogs to the user and wait for the reply a certain amount of time before automatically selecting the default options. Until now, the only way for the user to stop that countdown was to start editing some of the fields in the dialog.

    We got a bug report because that functionality was not working exactly as expected in some cases so, in addition to fixing the problem, we decided to revamp the user interface a little bit to improve usability. Now there are more user interactions that are taken into account to stop the counter, specially we added a new “stop” button displaying the remaining seconds. You can see an example of the result below.

  • Fedora 25 Alpha status is NO-GO
  • FOSS wave: Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

    Furthering the efforts of some work around building a strong, tight-knit FOSS community around Fedora, I approached a few people from Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. I figured out the scope to talk about Fedora and Fedora quality assurance (QA). The target audience was bringing more college students from Bhopal into open source and Fedora.

  • The top 10 IoT application areas – based on real IoT projects

    As part of a larger effort to track the IoT ecosystem, we set out, mining hundreds of homepages, and managed to assemble and verify 640 actual enterprise IoT projects (Note: We did not include any consumer IoT projects such as wearable devices or hobby projects).

  • This tiny $5 computer is giving the Raspberry Pi a run for its money

    When it comes simple homebrew computers, the Raspberry Pi has been king of the mountain for a long time. The ruler might have some new competition, however, if the wild Kickstarter success of Onion’s Omega2 is any indication.

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Leftovers: Software

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:18
  • Making documentation easy with Read the Docs

    In the Doc Dish column, we often have focused on writing documentation, but that's not the whole story. For what shall it profit a writer if they write the whole document and have no readers? Once documentation is written, it must get in front of the user so to be read. For anything beyond simple readme files, this can be a challenge; often documentation writers need design, hosting infrastructure, search tools, and so on. One project aims to make that a little easier.

    Read the Docs is an open source (MIT-licensed) project that started during the 2010 Django Dash. The goal of the project is to improve the quantity and quality of documentation by reducing barriers. Although Read the Docs can't write your documentation for you, it does handle automatically building from your source code management system. Docs are rendered as HTML and PDF and full-text search is included.

  • Rhythmbox 3.4 Released With New Web Remote Plugin

    A new version of Rhythmbox, the oft-overlooked desktop music app preinstalled on Ubuntu, is now available to download.

  • Confessions of a command line geek: why I don't use GNOME but everyone else should

    Despite what tablet- and phone-loving pundits say, the laptop is here to stay. When a user wants to watch a movie on a train, they reach for the tablet first. But if they want to do actual, real work, they still prefer the laptop.

    Meanwhile, software freedom should always be for everyone, not just technical users and software developers. The GNOME project was one of the first in this history of Free Software to realize this, and seek to create a free software desktop that truly allowed everyone to enjoy the software freedom that those of us had already happily found with Bash and Emacs (or vi years before.

    This keynote will discuss why GNOME remains best poised to deliver software freedom to everyone, how GNOME continues to be the best welcome-mat for those who want software freedom, and why GNOME remains absolutely essential to the advancement of software freedom for decades to come.

  • GUADEC/2

    Once again, GUADEC has come and gone.

    Once again, it was impeccably organized by so many wonderful volunteers.

    Once again, I feel my batteries recharged.

    Once again, I’ve had so many productive conversations.

    Once again, I’ve had many chances to laugh.

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Linux Foundation News

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:17

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Leftovers: Gaming

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:16

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Leftovers: KDE

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:15
  • Canonical Becomes a Patron of KDE e.V.

    KDE and Canonical's Ubuntu have collaborated for years. Today we celebrate the extension of this collaboration with the addition of Canonical to the KDE Patrons family, as part of the corporate membership program.

  • Canonical Is Now a Patron of KDE, as Part of the Corporate Membership Program

    Immediately after releasing KDE Applications 16.08, KDE was proud to announce that Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, one of the world's most popular GNU/Linux distributions, has become a patron of KDE e.V..

    KDE e.V. is the non-profit organization that represents the KDE Community and produces the modern and widely-used KDE Plasma desktop environment, along with the KDE Applications and KDE Frameworks suits of KDE software and libraries. KDE is known to have worked with Canonical's Ubuntu for many years, and they're happy that Canonical decided to extend this collaboration and join the KDE Patrons family, as part of the corporate membership program.

  • Plasma 5 is coming

    The KDE edition of Linux Mint 18 just passed QA and should be available as BETA this weekend.

  • Plasma Release Schedule Updated

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Android Leftovers

Fri, 2016-08-19 12:14
  • Why Google is building a new operating system

    Google is building a new operating system because it wants to move away from Android, a system that, while enabling it to gain market leadership, has given it a fair share of legal and other headaches over the eight years since it first arrived in the market.

  • Oracle says trial wasn’t fair, it should have known about Google Play for Chrome

    Oracle lawyers argued in federal court today that their copyright trial loss against Google should be thrown out because they were denied key evidence in discovery.

    Oracle attorney Annette Hurst said that the launch of Google Play on Chrome OS, which happened in the middle of the trial, showed that Google was trying to break into the market for Java SE on desktops. In her view, that move dramatically changes the amount of market harm that Oracle experienced, and the evidence should have been shared with the jury.

    "This is a game-changer," Hurst told US District Judge William Alsup, who oversaw the trial. "The whole foundation for their case is gone. [Android] isn't 'transformative'; it's on desktops and laptops."

    Google argued that its use of Java APIs was "fair use" for several reasons, including the fact that Android, which was built for smartphones, didn't compete with Java SE, which is used on desktops and laptops. During the post-trial hearing today, Hurst argued that it's clear that Google intends to use Android smartphones as a "leading wedge" and has plans to "suck in the entire Java SE market."

  • Google’s Russian Android Antitrust Appeal Just Failed

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