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Development News

Sun, 2016-05-01 19:28
  • Git for design projects
  • Updating POSIX

    To the first point, many people seem unaware that POSIX is an actual set of standards - IEEE 1003.1 in several variations, plus descendants. These standards cover a lot more than just operations on files, and technically "POSIX" only refers to systems that have passed a set of conformance tests covering all of those. Nonetheless, people often use "POSIX" to mean only the section dealing with file operations, and only in a loose sense of things that implement something like the standard without having been tested against it. Many systems, notably including Linux, pretty explicitly do not claim to comply with the actual standard.

  • Delete Your Dead Code!

    A few days ago, Ned Batchelder's post on deleting code made the rounds on HN, even though it was originally written in 2002. Here I want to echo a few of Ned's points, and take a stronger stance than he did: delete code as soon as you know you don't need it any more, no questions asked. I'll also offer some tips from the trenches for how to identify candidate dead code.

    This is the first in a series on eating your vegetables in software engineering, on good, healthy practices for a happy and successful codebase. I don't (yet) know how long the series will be, so please stay tuned!

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Security Leftovers

Sun, 2016-05-01 19:27
  • 66% of USB Flash Drives infected – don’t trust a stray [Ed: Windows]

    The problem is that the OS will automatically run a program that can install malware from a USB stick.

  • Dental Assn Mails Malware to Members

    The domain is used by crooks to infect visitors with malware that lets the attackers gain full control of the infected Windows computer.

  • Slack bot token leakage exposing business critical information

    Developers are leaking access tokens for Slack widely on GitHub, in public repositories, support tickets and public gists. They are extremely easy to find due to their structure. It is clear that the knowledge about what these tokens can be used for with malicious intent is not on top of people’s minds…yet. The Detectify team shows the impact, with examples, and explains how this could be prevented.

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Android Leftovers

Sun, 2016-05-01 18:52

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Debian and Devuan

Sun, 2016-05-01 18:46
  • An Open Letter to Linas Vepstas

    The entire essay continues on a similar note. Although the title implies this is a rant about Ubuntu and Debian, he seems to paint the entirety of Linux Land with the same broad brush. And that would be factually wrong.

    "Factually wrong" doesn't mean he hasn't pointed out some serious problems. He has. I and many other Linux users see the same problems he identifies. What's "factually wrong" is that these problems are built into the combination of kernel, system software, and applications generally called either "Linux" or "GNU/Linux". And his implication that there's no reasonable way for a user to avoid these problems is also factually wrong.

    The bottom line of my objection to his essay is this: Nobody should use software they don't like, especially if there's a reasonable alternative. And by extension, why is Linas still using Debian and Ubuntu and systemd and Firefox and Chrome and Gnome? There are reasonable alternatives to every single one of them.

  • March and April contributions
  • My work for Debian in April
  • Free software activities in April 2016
  • Devuan Jessie 1.0 Beta Screenshot Tour

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LinuxFest NorthWest 2016 and foss-north

Sun, 2016-05-01 18:44
  • LinuxFest NorthWest 2016

    I was at LinuxFest NorthWest 2016 last weekend. I’ve been going to LFNW for several years now, and I look forward to it every year – it’s just a great conference, which has managed to grow to nearly 2000 registrations this year while keeping its community/grassroots feel. The talks are always widely varied and interesting, and there’s a great feeling that you could run into anyone doing anything – I spent an hour or two at the social event talking to a group of college students who run a college radio station entirely on F/OSS, which was awesome.

  • foss-north – Schedule available

    Just a short update on foss-north – the schedule is up. We have a whole list of speakers that I’m super excited about and tickets are selling well. I still don’t know what to expect, but more than 1/3 of the tickets are gone and the sales numbers are actually even better for the full priced tickets than the early birds.

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Top 5 Best Alternative Linux Distributions for Windows 10 Users

Sun, 2016-05-01 17:41

Also check out the following articles to find out about our top Linux distributions of the year 2015 and 2016.

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Open Source Elections System: Update from City & County of San Francisco, California USA

Sun, 2016-05-01 13:15

The OSI has has voiced our support to recent efforts by the City and County of San Francisco's Department of Elections to develop an open source voting system. The following is an update provided to the OSI from Commissioner and Vice President of the Elections Commission, Chris Jerdonek.

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Developers Still Hoping For AMD DAL Support In Linux 4.7

Sun, 2016-05-01 13:09

Open-source developers working on the Radeon Linux graphics driver stack remain hopeful that their massive "DAL" code-base will be ready for merging with Linux 4.7.

DAL is the massive proposed addition to the AMDGPU DRM driver and is a lot of code opened up from the Catalyst proprietary driver. This display abstraction code is AMD's approach for implementing atomic mode-setting, DP MST, HDMI 2.0, better PowerPlay, better multi-display support, etc. It will also allow them to hopefully implement FreeSync support in their Linux driver.

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Review: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus)

Sun, 2016-05-01 12:34

When we get to our Conclusion, we always find recent Ubuntu releases a little difficult to summarize. This is probably because each new release does not really bring major changes to the table anymore, rather they all seem to feel like just another update. In truth, that’s all they really are. But when third-party Linux distributions continue to innovate and give their users something fresh each time a new release is delivered, we can’t help but wonder why Ubuntu Developers can not achieve the same. Yet we can not quite put our finger on what Canonical are doing wrong. Essentially, they’re not really doing anything wrong. They are just not really offering anything fresh, new or innovative anymore.

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Gorgeous Live Voyager 16.04 Linux OS Comes Hot on the Heels of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Sun, 2016-05-01 07:37

The team of developers behind the Live Voyager desktop-oriented operating system have announced today, May 1, 2016, the release and immediate availability for download of Voyager 16.04 LTS.

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BlackArch Linux Now Provides over 1,400 Penetration Testing Tools, New ISO Lands

Sun, 2016-05-01 07:11

The BlackArch Linux devs have been preparing this for months, but now it is finally here, the new ISO image of the Arch Linux-based operating system designed for hackers and security professionals.

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If I needed to leave Android, I'd use Sailfish OS

Sun, 2016-05-01 07:08

Sailfish OS may be unknown to most people, but if Android was to disappear tomorrow, this would be the direction I'd head. Sailfish OS is an open source mobile operating system that offers speed and simplicity like no other. And, in my opinion, is the best alternative to Android.

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Android Leftovers

Sun, 2016-05-01 01:36

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Mozilla News

Sun, 2016-05-01 01:23
  • WebExtensions in Firefox 48
  • Mozilla's WebExtensions API Is In Good Shape For Firefox 48

    Mozilla has announced that for Firefox 48 their WebExtensions API is considered to be in a stable state. They encourage developers looking to develop browser add-ons to begin using this new API.

    WebExtensions is an API for implementing new browser add-ons/extensions that makes it easier to port to/from other browsers, is compatible with Firefox's Electroloysis, and should be easier to work with than the current APIs. In particular, Google designed portions of the WebExtensions API around Google's Blink extension API.

  • Mozilla a Step Closer to Thunderbird Decision

    The good news is that the folks at Mozilla seem to be determined to find Thunderbird a good home where it will be able to grow and find newfound success. This isn’t surprising. As Surman pointed out in his post, the project is quite popular among those associated with the foundation — but that popularity is also contributing to the problem Mozilla has with keeping the project in-house.

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OpenStack Roundup

Sat, 2016-04-30 21:13
  • OpenStack Summit Returns to Austin With Much Fanfare

    Back in July 2010, 75 developers gathered at the Omni hotel here for the very first OpenStack Summit. At the time, OpenStack was in the earliest stages of development. In April 2016, OpenStack returned to Austin in triumph as the de facto standard for private cloud deployment and the platform of choice for a significant share of the Fortune 100 companies. About 7,500 people from companies of all sizes from all over the world attended the 2016 OpenStack Summit in Austin from April 25 to April 29. In 2010, there were no users, because there wasn't much code running, but in 2016, that has changed. Among the many OpenStack users speaking at the summit were executives from Verizon and Volkswagen Group. While the genesis of OpenStack was a joint effort between NASA and Rackspace, the 2016 summit was sponsored by some of the biggest names in technology today—including IBM, Cisco, Dell, EMC and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some highlights of the 2016 OpenStack Summit.

  • A Look Into IBM's OpenStack Meritocracy

    Angel Diaz, IBM vice president of Cloud Architecture and Technology, discusses how Big Blue has earned its place in the OpenStack community.

  • OpenStack cloud’s “killer use case”: Telcos and NFV

    Today, 114 petabytes of data traverse AT&T's network daily, and the carrier predicts a 10x increase in traffic by 2020.

    To help manage this, AT&T is transitioning from purpose-built appliances to white boxes running open source software. And according to AT&T Senior Vice President of Software Development and Engineering Sarabh Saxena, OpenStack has been a key part of this shift.

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Ubuntu 16.04 vs. vs. Clear Linux vs. openSUSE vs. Scientific Linux 7

Sat, 2016-04-30 18:55

Here are some extra Linux distribution benchmarks for your viewing pleasure this weekend.

Following the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS last week, I was running another fresh performance comparison of various Linux distributions on my powerful Xeon E3-1270 v5 Skylake system. I made it a few Linux distributions in before the motherboard faced an untimely death. Not sure of the cause yet, but the motherboard is kaput and thus the testing was ended prematurely.

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GhostBSD 10.3 ALPHA1 is now ready for Testing

Sat, 2016-04-30 17:06

Yes we skip 10.2 for 10.3 since was FreeBSD 10.3 was coming we thought we should wait for 10.3. This is the first ALPHA development release for testing and debugging for GhostBSD 10.3, only as MATE been released yet which is available on SourceForge and for the amd64 and i386 architectures.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

Sat, 2016-04-30 16:26
  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?

    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.

  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04

    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features

  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on

    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete.

    Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.

  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review

    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway.

    I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though

    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review.

    As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.

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