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today's leftovers

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:40
  • Google play store playing with GPS?

    Microsoft broke my father's computer: it made him update to Windows 10, when Windows 10 can not use two of 3 USB ports. Ouch.

  • Persistent storage patterns for Docker in production
  • IBM Announces Blockchain Cloud Services on LinuxOne Server

    A new cloud environment for business-to-business networks announced by IBM last week will allow companies to test performance, privacy, and interoperability of their blockchain ecosystems within a secure environment, the company said. Based on IBM’s LinuxONE, a Linux-only server designed for high-security projects, the new cloud environment will let enterprises test and run blockchain projects that handle private data for their customers.

    The service is still in limited beta, so IBM clients will not be able to get their hands on it just yet. Once it launches, however, the company said clients will be able to run blockchain in production environments that let them quickly and easily access secure, partitioned blockchain networks.

  • An honorary degree for Alan Cox

    Congratulations are due to Alan Cox, who was awarded an honorary degree by Swansea University for his work with Linux. "Alan started working on Version 0. There were bugs and problems he could correct. He put Linux on a machine in the Swansea University computer network, which revealed many problems in networking which he sorted out; later he rewrote the networking software. Alan brought to Linux software engineering discipline: Linux software releases that were tested, corrected and above all stable. On graduating, Alan worked at Swansea University, set up the UK Linux server and distributed thousands of systems."

  • [antergos] ISO Refresh 2016.07.19
  • Video: Hardware hacking basics for Linux software devs

    In this interesting ELC video, Grant Likely, a Linux kernel engineer and maintainer of the Linux Device Tree, describes his sojourn into embedded hardware.

    Sometimes the best tutorials come not from experts, but from proficient newcomers who are up to date on the latest entry-level technologies and can remember what it’s like to be a newbie. It also helps if, like Grant Likely, the teacher is a major figure in embedded Linux who understands how hardware is ignited by software.

    At the Embedded Linux Conference, Likely — who is a Linux kernel engineer, and maintainer of the Linux Device Tree subsystem used by many embedded systems — described his embedded hardware journey in a presentation called “Hardware Design for Linux Engineers” — or as he put it, “explaining stuff I only learned six months ago.”

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Leftovers: Software

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:38

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GNOME News

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:35
  • Responding with emoji

    In Diana's usability test, she will moderate a "first experience" of GNOME. Testers will login to GNOME using a fresh "test" login, and go through the first-time experience. The testers will use a few scenario tasks to guide them through tasks that most users would usually do on a new computer (check email, copy files from a USB stick). Afterwards, Diana will interview each tester to see what they thought.

  • BOF session of Nautilus – GUADEC
  • GNOME's Mutter Sees Big Rework, Striving For Multi-DPI Rendering

    A ton of patches hit GNOME's Mutter this morning by Jonas Ådahl as he's been working towards multi DPI rendering and other improvements by drawing monitor contents to individual frame-buffers.

    Jonas has been reworking Mutter to draw monitor contents to individual frame-buffers rather than targeting a single frame-buffer, in order to support situations of having multiple monitors with a desire to have independent DPI changes for each display (e.g. one HiDPI display and other displays that are not), etc. Jonas summarized it with this bug report.

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Red Hat News

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:34

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Fedora: The Latest

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:33
  • Now Available: The Ultimate Fedora T-Shirt!

    If you’ve been involved in free and open source projects like Fedora for very long, you know one of the most sought-after “swag” items is a t-shirt with your projects’ logo. Until now, the easiest way to get a Fedora T-shirt has been to go to a big event like Flock, or through events organized & supported by our Fedora Ambassadors around the world.

  • Council Elections: Interview with Langdon White (langdon)

    Simply put, I have been actively involved and an active user of Fedora for about 4.5 years. I have been, almost exclusively, a Linux user for 10 years and I had dabbled in Linux before that. I have been a Linux sysadmin and a Linux developer (mostly a developer) for approximately 15 years.

  • Fedora 22 end of life

    As of July 19, 2016, Fedora 22 has reached its end of life for updates and support. No more updates, not even security fixes, will be provided for Fedora 22. Fedora 23 will be maintained with updated packages until approximately one month after the release of Fedora 25.

    Upgrading to Fedora 23 or Fedora 24 is highly recommended for all users still running Fedora 22. For more information on upgrading Fedora, check out the DNF System Upgrade page on the Fedora Project wiki.

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Debconf/Debian Leftovers

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:32

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OSS Leftovers

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:29
  • Google Leverages its AI Tools to Slash Data Center Energy Consumption
  • Tutorials, workflows, and a place to showcase high-quality FOSS photography

    There's a special place to chat with fellow photographers, learn about high-end FOSS photography software, and share your work with others. It's called PIXLS.US, and it's a large and wonderful world beyond Photoshop.

    This is truly a golden age in the hobby of photography. Never before has it been so inexpensive and easy to take and share great photos. The rise of smartphones has fueled an explosion in casual photography, and the ecosystem is further extended through the proliferation of media-sharing apps like Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Lower costs for better cameras has enabled many budding photographers to take up the hobby. Unfortunately, while much of the underlying software that fuels the apps and platforms is built on free/open source software, there is little fanfare for the projects that are available directly to photographers.

  • Solskogen 2016 videos

    I just published the videos from Solskogen 2016 on Youtube; you can find them all in this playlist. The are basically exactly what was being sent out on the live stream, frame for frame, except that the audio for the live shader compos has been remastered, and of course a lot of dead time has been cut out (the stream was sending over several days, but most of the time, only the information loop from the bigscreen).

  • REMINDER! systemd.conf 2016 CfP Ends in Two Weeks!

    Please note that the systemd.conf 2016 Call for Participation ends in less than two weeks, on Aug. 1st! Please send in your talk proposal by then! We’ve already got a good number of excellent submissions, but we are interested in yours even more!

    We are looking for talks on all facets of systemd: deployment, maintenance, administration, development. Regardless of whether you use it in the cloud, on embedded, on IoT, on the desktop, on mobile, in a container or on the server: we are interested in your submissions!

  • Reducing Adobe Flash Usage in Firefox

    Browser plugins, especially Flash, have enabled some of our favorite experiences on the Web, including videos and interactive content. But plugins often introduce stability, performance, and security issues for browsers. This is not a trade-off users should have to accept.

    Mozilla and the Web as a whole have been taking steps to reduce the need for Flash content in everyday browsing. Starting in August, Firefox will block certain Flash content that is not essential to the user experience, while continuing to support legacy Flash content. These and future changes will bring Firefox users enhanced security, improved battery life, faster page load, and better browser responsiveness.

  • Splice Machine Launches Open Source RDBMS Sandbox

    Splice Machine, which provides an RDBMS powered by Hadoop and Spark, has announced a cloud-based sandbox for developers to put its just launched open source Community Edition to the test. The company is making available an open source standalone and cluster download, and has announced the general availability of V2.0, and the launch of its developer community site.

  • Koha Integrated Library System Brings FOSS to Libraries

    Randal Schwartz, from TWiT.tv’s “FLOSS Weekly,” interviews Nicole Engard and Brendan Gallagher, about the open source Koha Integrated Library System (ILS), which originated in New Zealand in 1999. Along with being a web developer, Nicole is a prolific blogger on Opensource.com and last year was recognized by Red Hat for her significant contributions to open source advocacy.

  • Why Did Microsoft Embrace Open Source? [Ed: Did BP embrace wing power? Did Blair embrace peace? Did Hitler embrace Judaism? Loaded question here. Microsoft never embraced FOSS but hijacked what already existed and could help it make money. All core products are still proprietary.]
  • Facebook Has Already Open Sourced More Than 50 Projects In 2016 [Ed: 'open' Facebook. Except pretty much everything in the site, the app, etc.]
  • The Ember 3D Printer: High-Resolution, Open-Source 3D Printing on Your Desktop

    Though Autodesk’s interest in 3D printing was not unknown, it may have been a bit of a surprise when the CAD developer entered the industry with its own 3D printer in 2014. Ember, Autodesk’s first hardware product, is a digital light processing (DLP) 3D printer capable of high-resolution prints for prototyping and even end part production. What may be most unique about the Ember is that both the printer and one of its materials are open-source, a bold move for a large corporation like Autodesk.

  • AT&T, Orange target NFV, SDN open source, standards

    AT&T and Orange signed a deal to tackle NFV and SDN open source and standards issues that continue to plague the telecom industry

    AT&T signed a deal with European operator Orange to work on open source and standardization initiatives linked to the carrier’s push toward increasing control of its network resources using software-defined networking and network functions virtualization technology.

  • DIGST: ‘Denmark should update eInvoicing systems’

    Denmark’s public administrations should overhaul their eInvoicing solutions, writes the Agency for Digitisation (Digitaliseringsstyrelsen - DIGST). The agency wants public administrations to prepare to introduce a European-wide eInvoicing standard, and to concentrate on the use of Danish 2010 eInvoicing standard, OIOUBL. Its forerunner, OIOXML, is to be phased out.

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • How many mobile phone accounts will be hijacked this summer?

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LibreOffice News

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:27
  • LIBOCon: get around Brno

    Yesterday I added Get around Brno page to the LibreOffice Conference website. There you can find comprehensive information about public transport in Brno, how to buy tickets, how to get to the hotel/venue if you arrive by train/bus/car/plane etc. All accompanied with maps and pictures of described places. So hopefully no one will get lost on their way to the hotel or venue, or struggle purchasing tickets.

  • LibreOffice developer interview: Winfried Donkers

    In this week’s developer interview, we talk to Winfried Donkers, a Dutch coder who has been using LibreOffice (and its predecessors) for almost two decades, and today works on Calc.

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FOSS in Government

TuxMachines - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:24
  • ‘GovStrap’ open source kit helps sites replicate GDS website theme

    Open Source Software specialist OpusVL has created a way to take the Gov.UK website theme created by the Government Digital Service (GDS) and reproduce it quickly in designing and building public sector websites.

    The solution uses Bootstrap, an HTML, CSS and JavaScript framework originating from Twitter, which is used for creating front end websites and applications. With an increase in the variety of devices used to view websites, Bootstrap is a standard toolkit for building responsive design and enabling websites to be mobile and tablet friendly.

    With sharing and re-use of software and technology high on the GDS agenda, OpusVL adopted the principle by importing the GDS work and “re-factoring” it in the form of the Bootstrap framework in addition to the methods originally created by GDS.

  • As it Mandates Open Source, is Bulgaria Opening Questionable Doors?

    For decades now, open source tools and applications have been gaining enormous traction in parts of Europe, and cities such as Munich have even been involved in a multi-year effort to transform technology infrastructure by throwing out proprietary applications and using open source tools instead.

    In the latest move on this front, Bulgaria recently passed legislation requiring that government software be open source. The move underscores how pervasive open source applications and platforms have become. Now, though, there is growing debate about whether Bulgaria is making a wise move, or one that could open it up to security threats.

  • Could Bulgaria's open source law transform government software worldwide?

    Ripples from Bulgaria's recent decision requiring all software written for the government to be open source could build into something bigger.

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News: Linux Top 3: Network Security Toolkit, Untangle NG Firewall and IPFire

LXer - Thu, 2016-07-21 09:11
A trio of security focused Linux distributions get big updates.

How to install October CMS on a CentOS 7 VPS

LXer - Thu, 2016-07-21 08:14
October CMS is a free content management software based on the Laravel PHP Framework, with the best back-end user interface ever seen in a CMS.

Four Alternatives to Raspbian and Ubuntu MATE

LinuxToday - Thu, 2016-07-21 08:00

 FOSSforce: While Raspbian and Ubuntu MATE remain the go-to distros for many Raspberry Pi users, our Pi guy reminds us that there are others, and offers us a look at four alternatives.

Microsoft Isn’t Going Away Any Time Soon

LXer - Thu, 2016-07-21 07:17
When Steve Ballmer left Microsoft, the company seemed to be losing its grip and many predicted the company would slowly slide into oblivion. The company's latest financials show the company to be healthy, and not likely to quit being a thorn in FOSS's side for the foreseeable future.

rx480 vs. gtx 1060

Reddit - Thu, 2016-07-21 07:11

Hei there, I'm still struggling to decide whether I should buy an AMD rx480 and have a card that works well with mesa and wayland, or have the gtx 1060 which works better for most games on steam. Maybe you can help me to decide.

submitted by /u/theScrabi
[link] [comments]

Linux deleted 1tb of drive space.

Reddit - Thu, 2016-07-21 06:35

I went away while it was installing amd i came back... 1TB (one of my drives) EMPTY. Years of work on it... is it just hidden? PLEASE HELP ME!!!!!

submitted by /u/-Tilde
[link] [comments]

Your Favorite Laptop for Linux

Reddit - Thu, 2016-07-21 06:28

As the title suggests, what is your favorite laptop to run Linux on? What is your dream laptop to run Linux on?

Expect an upcoming video to this subreddit about Linux Laptops...

submitted by /u/RevEngr
[link] [comments]

How to install Arch Linux on Dell XPS 13 (2016) in 7 steps

LXer - Thu, 2016-07-21 06:20
I love the Dell XPS 13 (2016) that Dell gave me on loan. But installing Arch Linux with UEFI enabled can be challenging for new users — especially since ‘grub’ doesn’t work on this system with Arch Linux. I talked to a lot of people in the Arch community and resorted to using systemd-boot for successful install. Here's how I got Arch Linux running on the Dell XPS 13 laptop.

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