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Go 1.7 is released

LinuxToday - Tue, 2016-08-16 16:00

Go 1.7 includes many additions, improvements, and fixes.

LLVM/Clang 3.9 Is Shipping Soon With OpenCL 2.0, ThinLTO & Much More

Phoronix - Tue, 2016-08-16 16:00
If all goes well, LLVM/Clang 3.9.0 will be released next week. With this major feature release right around the corner, here is a look at some of the exciting features and changes to this open-source compiler stack...

Some Windows 10 Anniversary Update: SSD freeze

LXer - Tue, 2016-08-16 15:52
OS and apps & data on different storage media? OopsWindows 10 Anniversary Update is crashing on some PCs employing a solid-state drive.…

Are you running LUKS in production? What is your use-case? How goes it? Caveats?

Reddit - Tue, 2016-08-16 15:45

A recent post in r/homelab regarding best-practices mentioned learning LUKS. While I agree it would be quite advantageous to know - I then realized that I have NEVER seen LUKS in use in any enterprise/production environment (on-premise, anyhow..)

So - if you do use LUKS in production:
* what do the systems do?
* why was LUKS necessary?
* what additional headaches does LUKS cause?
* what additional considerations where needed (kickstart integration, passphrase management, etc...?
* has LUKS screwed you over?

Next week I'll ask about SElinux... then start a flame-war for "vi vs emacs" ;-)

submitted by /u/idioteques
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GNOME Turns 19, Debian Turns 23 Years Old

Phoronix - Tue, 2016-08-16 15:03
There are at least two exciting Linux/open-source birthdays to celebrate this week...

Debian turns 23!

LinuxToday - Tue, 2016-08-16 15:00

Today is Debian's 23rd anniversary. If you are close to any of the cities celebrating Debian Day 2016, you're very welcome to join the party!

today's leftovers

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-08-16 14:58

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New Releases

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-08-16 14:58
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Linux Kernel 4.8 Release Candidate Build

    As expected, Linus Torvalds made his Sunday announcement for the second RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Linux 4.8 kernel branch, which is now available for public testing.

    Linux kernel 4.8 entered development last week, when the merge window was officially closed and the first Release Candidate development milestone released to the world. According to Linus Torvalds, the second RC build is here to update more drivers, even more hardware architectures, as well as to fix issues for supported filesystems and add some extra mm work.

  • Elive 2.7.2 Beta Is Out with Spotify Support, Improved Artwork, and Thunar Fixes

    On August 14, 2016, the Elive development team was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of yet another Beta version of the Elive Linux operating system.

    Elive 2.7.2 comes only three weeks after the release of the previous Beta build, version 2.7.1, to implement out-of-the-box support for the popular Spotify digital music service, giving users direct access to millions of songs if they have a paid subscription, and a much-improved artwork, as both the system and icon themes were enhanced.

  • First Beta of Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" Hits the Streets, Based on Ubuntu 14.04.5

    Until today, Black Lab Linux 8.0 "Onyx" has been in the Alpha stages of development and received a total of four Alpha builds that have brought multiple updated components and GNU/Linux technologies, but now the Ubuntu-based operating system has entered a much more advanced development state, Beta, and the first one is here exactly six months after the development cycle started.

    "Today the Black Lab Linux development team is pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8 'Onyx' Beta 1. Bringing us one step closer to our goal of a stable, secure, and long term supported Linux desktop for the masses. 'Onyx' Beta 1 is a culmination of over 6 months of user collaboration and feedback," says Roberto J. Dohnert, Black Lab Software CEO.

  • Maui 1 Screenshot Tour

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News About Servers

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-08-16 14:57
  • Why private clouds will suffer a long, slow death

    Analyst firm Wikibon believes that no vendor is making more than $100 million via OpenStack. If that’s anywhere near true, the sum total of all vendors has to be less than $2 billion.

  • M$ Shoots Foot, Again

    Not being able to sell software unbundled from hardware is a terrible deficit in a world where people are building open servers.

  • Microsoft: Why we had to tie Azure Stack to boxen we picked for you

    Microsoft has explained the rationale behind last month’s announcement that you won’t be allowed to simply download Azure Stack and get going.

    In July Redmond informed fans the only way they’d be able to get Azure in their own data centres would be on hardware of its choosing.

    Specifically, Azure Stack will only come pre-installed on pre-integrated servers from Dell, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and Lenovo. Other OEMs, we’re promised, will follow.

    The Dell, HP and Lenovo will come “sometime” in 2017. Azure Stack had been expected by the end of 2016, but the work with to produce integrated systems will mean a delay.

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Let's Encrypt: Why create a free, automated, and open CA?

LXer - Tue, 2016-08-16 14:55
During the summer of 2012, Eric Rescorla and I decided to start a Certificate Authority (CA). A CA acts as a third-party to issue digital certificates, which certify public keys for certificate holders.read more

FOSS and Security

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-08-16 14:53
  • Coffee Shop DevOps: How to use feedback loops to get smarter
  • How to design your project for participation

    Working openly means designing for participation. "Designing for participation" is a way of providing people with insight into your project, which you've built from the start to incorporate and act on that insight. Documenting how you intend to make decisions, which communication channels you’ll use, and how people can get in touch with you are the first steps in designing for participation. Other steps include working openly, being transparent, and using technologies that support collaboration and additional ways of inviting participation. In the end, it’s all about providing context: Interested people must be able to get up to speed and start participating in your project, team, or organization as quickly and easily as possible.

  • So long, Firefox Hello!

    After updating my PCLinuxOS install, I noticed that the icon of Firefox Hello had changed: it was read and displayed a message reading "Error!"

    I thought it was a simply login failure, so I logged in and the icon went green, as normal. However, I noticed that Hello did not display the "Start a conversation" window, but one that read "browse this page with a friend".

    A bit confused, I called Megatotoro, who read this statement from Mozilla to me. Apparently, I had missed the fact that Mozilla is discontinuing Hello starting from Firefox 49. Current Firefox version is 48, so...

  • FreeBSD 11.0 Up to Release Candidate State, Support for SSH Protocol v1 Removed

    The FreeBSD Project, through Glen Barber, has had the pleasure of announcing this past weekend the general availability of the first Release Candidate for the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system, due for release on September 2, 2016.

    It appears to us that the development cycle of FreeBSD 11.0 was accelerated a bit, as the RC1 milestone is here just one week after the release of the fourth Beta build. Again, the new snapshot is available for 64-bit (amd64), 32-bit (i386), PowerPC (PPC), PowerPC 64-bit (PPC64), SPARC64, AArch64 (ARM64), and ARMv6 hardware architectures.

  • Open Source//Open Society Conference Live Blog

    This conference offers 2 huge days of inspiration, professional development and connecting for those interested in policy, data, open technology, leadership, management and team building.

  • White House Source Code Policy Should Go Further

    A new federal government policy will result in the government releasing more of the software that it creates under free and open source software licenses. That’s great news, but doesn’t go far enough in its goals or in enabling public oversight.

    A few months ago, we wrote about a proposed White House policy regarding how the government handles source code written by or for government agencies. The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has now officially enacted the policy with a few changes. While the new policy is a step forward for government transparency and open access, a few of the changes in it are flat-out baffling.

  • The Brewing Problem Of PGP Short-ID Collision Attacks
  • Starwood, Marriott, Hyatt, IHG hit by malware: HEI

    A data breach at 20 U.S. hotels operated by HEI Hotels & Resorts for Starwood, Marriott, Hyatt and Intercontinental may have divulged payment card data from tens of thousands of food, drink and other transactions, HEI said on Sunday.

  • Linux TCP Flaw Leaves 80% Android Phones Open To Spying
  • Good morning Android!

read more

Intel Kaby Lake Support Added To Beignet OpenCL

Phoronix - Tue, 2016-08-16 14:53
Intel's Beignet project for providing open-source OpenCL support for Intel HD/Iris Graphics hardware on Linux now has support for upcoming Kaby Lake processors...

FreeBSD Catching Up To Linux DRM Graphics Drivers, In Sync With Git

Phoronix - Tue, 2016-08-16 14:39
For the first time ever, the FreeBSD DRM drivers match the code of what's found in the upstream Linux kernel Git. They started off trailing many releases behind the state of the upstream Linux kernel, but as of now the Intel DRM as the first driver has made it to be in sync with the current Linux 4.8 development code...

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